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  • You should see some of the stuff the US Department of Labor puts out. They have sliced and diced cognition, personal skill and mechanical abilities and matched them to tens of thousands of jobs. It’s a huge, valuable resource in doing career counseling. That FBI book has that familiar feeling to it. I wanted to sit down and read it. I can borrow R…[Read more]

  • Nice to run into you again, Christian. I had never heard of Lilian so it was nice to meet her.

  • No. I now care about Anna (almost as much as I care about her dog) so I felt tremendous grief and confusion (the right kind of confusion for that moment) when she touched his silicon face.

    I think you’ve hit all the marks here.

  • Me, too. There was a point where you found her voice. You’ve been going gangbusters ever since.

  • Oh thank you. Good catch. Another fix for my rewrite.

    Actually, they didn’t mark the spot. The rigs are huge, the water covers a bit of territory and everyone remembers where they saw the end of the dowsing rod bend down. I never thought of it before, but marking it would be logical. I’ll have to have Kathryn ask about it and Roger explain it.…[Read more]

  • My rewrite is go into involve revamping scenes 3-5 enormously to introduce the various family members, expand Papa’s presence, etc. The scenes occupying those positions need to go much later in the story. I have no idea how I will do this swapping, logistically without messing up my pints and confusing the heck out of everyone.

  • Mr. Sloth does appear to be hanging at the top of the closet (how odd of him) so I reckon you could use either. I had a dim recollection of upmost, but nice to have a definition to refresh my memory.

  • Oh my. I love the title. It’s perfect.

    And the description, sadly, is also perfect. You’ve captured this gruesome contest from both sides of the cape. Very well done. And yes, you’ve added a lot to the image.

  • Now I want to go have a cup of tea with you–in your home, of course.

    It’s interesting that you are describing a lovely glass-walled home in what sounds like a rural setting in response to an image of a block of pretty standard city terraced houses. The contrast is striking.

  • I like the repetition of the first line. It somehow focused my attention to the rest of the poem.

  • Oh my, how intriguing, both the artwork and your reaction to it. I had to read the poem twice, after pondering the image for several minutes. It was worth the effort.

    My only question is whether the sloth was hung with the upmost care or the utmost care. Could go either way, I suppose.

    This is a really haunting image. And your final…[Read more]

  • Thank you, dixieray. I’m often surprised by my own last lines. I have no idea why. I loved the sun-drenched whitewashed light in the painting. We don’t often get a lot of sun here.

    Now I’m going to reread your poem about a sloth in a closet. A rather interesting concept for both visual and poetic arts.

  • Thank you, Maria. To be honest, I wouldn’t have thought to do that on my own, either. A poet friend of mine suggested it. It caused me to research the artist, which was good. She lived almost the exact span of time as the grandparents who raised me. I was tempted to compare her life with theirs on either side of the ocean. I may add that between…[Read more]

  • Reflections on Twilight Scene (Lilian Davidson 1889-1954)

    Sun-drenched yard,
    whitewashed buildings,
    donkey cart loaded with bags.

    A donkey waits for the farmer
    to sell his load of oats.

    The artist, a daughter […]

    • Hi Sherry,
      I enjoyed your poem. It described the picture shown. It was interesting that you include something about the artist. I hadn’t thought of doing that. Nice one.

      • Thank you, Maria. To be honest, I wouldn’t have thought to do that on my own, either. A poet friend of mine suggested it. It caused me to research the artist, which was good. She lived almost the exact span of time as the grandparents who raised me. I was tempted to compare her life with theirs on either side of the ocean. I may add that between her life stanza and mine.

        Off to read your poem now.

    • Great example of the prompt and I love the last line ” Yet the sun still shines” beautifully hopeful… well done

      • Thank you, dixieray. I’m often surprised by my own last lines. I have no idea why. I loved the sun-drenched whitewashed light in the painting. We don’t often get a lot of sun here.

        Now I’m going to reread your poem about a sloth in a closet. A rather interesting concept for both visual and poetic arts.

    • Hello Sherry,
      One of the nice things about the ekphrastic prompt is that we get to explore different artists chosen by so many poets. I much enjoyed looking at Lillian Davidson’s work. Thank you for introducing me to her art. I like your last two lines.

  • Scene 20 is HERE.21 Jayce Finds WaterMama and Roger continued to work on the building. Mama said Roger was really smart when it came to building. He not only knew how to pour a foundation, put up the framing and […]

    • A small technical detail on the dowsing description. You say he holds the two shorter ends (the Y of the stick) close to his belly, but you don’t say that the rest of the stick is parallel to the ground, With this description it could be vertical.
      It becomes evident later on, but you asked for feedback on this specifically.
      I’d also add how he marks Jayce’s spot. He wouldn’t just hop into his car without very clearly marking out where the drilling/digging is to happen.

      • Oh thank you. Good catch. Another fix for my rewrite.

        Actually, they didn’t mark the spot. The rigs are huge, the water covers a bit of territory and everyone remembers where they saw the end of the dowsing rod bend down. I never thought of it before, but marking it would be logical. I’ll have to have Kathryn ask about it and Roger explain it. But I think I will have Kathryn put a rock on the spot anyway. And Jayce can be delighted with. That would ring true.

        The well driller we had when I was a kid dowsed. And he found water, too. Unfortunately, when he started to drill it because every apparent it was a water pipe belonging to a neighbour. Oops.

        As as adult, I had a point well for about 20 years. It’s an old technology, just a pipe with a perforated arrow-shaped metal thing on the end. They dowse for water, then drive the pointed pipe into the ground at that spot until they hit it. We never ran out of water but eventually the point got clogged with sand so we moved up to fifties’ technology and put in a dug well.

        That also never ran out of water, mainly because we were at the bottom of an enormous swale. Half our land was swamp, with a small pond across the dirt road we lived on. I wasn’t about to waste money on an artesian well in that topography. I worked for a conservation district so I was surrounded by soil scientists and their soil maps.

  • We love the staff of the Department of Nitpickery. They save our bacon over and over again, so thank you.

    1- Mama is actually on the ground, having climbed down the ladder. BUT… I see I had her put the hammer down on the roof before she did that. And I need to make it clearer that she is, indeed, on the ground.

    I am forever moving people…[Read more]

  • OMG. First off, the setting in the library is a character unto itself. Good use of detail (the sweaty palm print on the counter).

    And the punch to the gut at the end.

    You might be one scene behind, but you’re totally on target. I’m still feeling sad and stunned and I never even knew James. It’s just such an emotional conundrum you’ve…[Read more]

  • Yeah, a little smoking in the girls’ room to offset Sheila’s naturally rosy picture of her daughter.

  • Ah, so there IS such a book. Excellent. I love research. I just refreshed my mind on the topic of dowsing today.

    I think Christine is spot on in recommending counseling. She’s been to this movie before, seen the result of letting the cracks in a traumatised relationship grow into unbridgeable chasms. Sheila’s in bits and pieces on the other…[Read more]

  • Oh my, Patty, you’ve done such a perfect job of answering those Reynolds-FBI-psychics questions. It’s like you went back and did a thorough clean up.

    The result? I find myself trusting you as a writer, a concept I’ve only understood intellectually until now.

    I must ask: Is there such a book? It’s entirely believable to me that there would…[Read more]

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Sherry

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@sherry

Active 8 hours, 12 minutes ago
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