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  • Wow, Charles. You’ve really scrunched up my emotions with this one. I’ve almost no words. This is definitely one of your best, although all your work is ‘one of your best’ in my humble opinion. I love this: ‘if you breathed me in, / you’d see my breath is a torment without you,’ I do hope to read more of your work in 2021. And, yes, p…[Read more]

  • Hi Christian. Thank you for your comments. I’ll be looking out for your work in 2021 too. Happy Christmas to you and yours.

  • This is such a charming story, Juanita. You drew me right into your scenes and images. Well done and thank you for sharing.

  • Thank you for your comments, Juanita. I never knew Jill tripped Jack either. Until I made it up for the story. :-O

  • Thanks for your lovely comments, Peggy. What a great Idea to have the fox wear a fleece jacket! Wish I’d thought of that. I’m glad you enjoyed the story.

  • Thanks for reading, Pam

  • Ah, Jane. You’re so kind. Thank you.

  • Hi Jane. I’ve learned a new poetry form – Ekphrastic Poetry. I had never heard of this. So, thank you for that. Your poem is beautiful and have to agree that it is one of your best. There is such longing and vulnerability throughout. Well done and thank you for sharing.

  • Hi Christian. This is sinister. I love how you’ve chosen to write from the perspective of the perpetrator. The last two lines are chilling, to say the least. Well done and thank you for sharing.

  • Lovely, Pam. As usual. Glad you did some editing on this. I’m not sure about this line though: ‘The distance dwarfed by empathy.’ I can’t quite work out what you’re saying here. I love the last line. Thanks for sharing.

  • Hi Maria. Again I’m reading so much more between the lines of your poem. I love that you’ve used no capital letters and no punctuation in this. However, I wonder if an exception needs to be made for ‘imposters aroma’ with an apostrophe – ‘imposter’s aroma’. The rhyming is spot on, as well. Will ‘you’ return now that ‘i’ has the correct…[Read more]

  • Hi Maria. Sheep-jabber is just the word/s I used to describe the sounds that sheep make when a group of them ‘baa’ in a field. So, I literally mean there are sheep in the field ‘baaing’ in the rain as my ‘she’ in the poem runs outside. ‘Your hand like a stop sign in her face’ is also literal. I meant it to be like when someone puts their hand…[Read more]

  • Merry Christmas to you and yours too, Jane.

  • No. It’s not Jane. I seem to have got the wrong idea over to readers. There’s no physical abuse intended in this poem.

  • There’s no physical contact in this poem,Cathy. No one needs to go anywhere. Thanks for reading.

  • Two of You by June Hunter#This is the you that takes her off guard.Sends her in crashing circlesinto rocks she never saw coming.Your hand like a stop sign in her face.Her senses pummelled like a drum.Your precious […]

    • wow! I felt that hand.
      Go while the going’s good, girl!

      • There’s no physical contact in this poem,Cathy. No one needs to go anywhere. Thanks for reading.

        • No. But the anger’s there. I thought your poem conjured up that intimidation well.
          Reading the other comments, I see now that the anger dispersing at the end signals a changeover, which wouldn’t happen so quickly with a regular argument, but having no personal experience of bipolar disorder it wasn’t what first came to mind.
          A difficult knife-edge to live on though.

    • Hi June, so is this the you the reeled her in, only to change to a nasty you that wants to change, manipulate and control? If so I agree with Cathy – run like the wind Bullseye:)
      A great poem June:) Thanks for sharing.
      Merry Christmas to you and your family:)

    • I have to say; I didn’t know what sheep-jabber is. After looking it up, I couldn’t find the two words together. I knew what jabber was. I’m perplexed why you put sheep in front of jabber.

      I also would like to ask about the line; Your hand like a stop sign in her face.
      What did you mean in that line?

      I believe this will resonate with many of the readers. Too many women deal with abuse.

      Great job with the prompt.

      • Hi Maria. Sheep-jabber is just the word/s I used to describe the sounds that sheep make when a group of them ‘baa’ in a field. So, I literally mean there are sheep in the field ‘baaing’ in the rain as my ‘she’ in the poem runs outside. ‘Your hand like a stop sign in her face’ is also literal. I meant it to be like when someone puts their hand in front of a persons face and says ‘talk to the hand’, because they’re not listening or don’t want to discuss something. The poem is not about abuse. I meant it as a poem about a woman trying to deal with a person with a bi-polar personality disorder and trying to keep her own sanity at the same time – without saying all of that. Obviously this is not coming across at all. So, it’s a bit of a failure, I suppose.

        • Hi June, oh no, not a failure. Please don’t say that. Poems are perceived differently by so many. It is what I love about them. Many people have read mine and seen something I hadn’t intended at all:) It is a great poem, and your explanations help a lot:) Thanks.

    • I’ve read the other comments and I agree, it sounds like physical abuse. Words like crashing, pummelled, snarl, mallets pounding. The purple cloud seems to indicate bruising. It could also be describing physical symptomatology like a migraine headache. Whatever, the wording is strong and the reader feels sympathy for the “she” in the poem.

    • Hi June,

      This is so powerful. I really admire you for making all those violent images and then tempering them with the gentle raindrops and soft sheep-jabber. A great poem.

      All the best for the coming festive season and I look forward to reading more of your poetry in 2021.

      • Hi Christian. Thank you for your comments. I’ll be looking out for your work in 2021 too. Happy Christmas to you and yours.

  • Hi Teresa. I like that you’ve managed to spin a 1200 word story around serving up tea in a cafe. Jane has already pointed out some of the edits that I picked up as well. I’m not sure about a lot of things. Has he done away with Alice? Was Miranda an ex? There’s a lot more to be written in this story and I think that’s the problem I’m having…[Read more]

  • You have such a great imagination, Maria; and are well able to transfer it to the page. Small things that I picked up have already been mentioned in other comments, so I’ll just say: Well done and thank you for sharing.

  • This is just beautiful, Peggy. As your writing always is. I love how you describe GrammaLou’s hands, with such sensitivity. They seem to reflect both fragility and strength – a thread which runs through the entire story. Well done, once again.

  • Great story, Susan. I love the tongue-in-cheek humour, and the great opening. It drew me right in to the story. One niggle ‘snarled nastily’ – you don’t need that nasty adverb. A snarl is nasty already. I do hope there will be more chapters to this story. Well done and thank you for sharing.

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June Hunter

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@june-hunter

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