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  • Riham Gharib and Profile picture of BobBob are now friends 1 week ago

  • Hello Jane

    Thank you so much, my dear, for your lovely words and thorough read.

    You felt the dashing of the river and the cruelty of the dam exactly as I imagined them. It’s a very real moment in life, that I wish nobody gets to experience. Meandering and sharing renewed hope is a bit of a fantasy sometimes, but I hope it’s what we’ll all get soon.

  • Thank you so much, Debbie. You always read through to the deeper levels of the words. I truly appreciate that.

    I always found that sand and sea relationship quite interesting. they never get enough of each other, but they never stay together. And sometimes the waves leave the sand to dry. It’s easy to find parallels with how we relate to…[Read more]

  • Hello Thia

    So glad you stopped by and read my poem. Thank you for all the kind words dear.

    The masculine reference comes from the Arabic language. Much like French, everything gets to have a gender. In Arabic, the river, the ocean, the sea, the moon, and the swamp are all male. While the lake, the oasis, the earth, and the sun, are all…[Read more]

  • “But to be frank
    I just started to sketch the words”

    I like the way images, sounds, and written words, build into beautiful poems. But the apparent beauty doesn’t mean much without the personal feeling. The honest expression of a thought, the description of a specific moment, and how it came to be.

    I think this poem is lovely in its…[Read more]

  • Hello Charles

    Your opening lines are so easy to identify with. Who is ever truly ready? And yet, we often pretend to be!

    These lines are pure magic:

    “One minute I’m tempted to speak,
    the other I turn into a ghost
    spellbound by the moments”

    And then, you go on describing these moments of utter connection. The physical sensuality s…[Read more]

  • The Suffocated Tears of a River by Riham Gharib

    *

    And the river runs its course 

    Without a care in the world 

    Flirts with the meadows

    Generously pours into expectant lakes

    Meandering, dashing, Joyfully g […]

    • Hi Riham,
      What a poetic take on a river. I was particularly struck by the description of the river hitting the dam. And, also, your poetic take on the mighty ocean. I am wondering why you give the river the masculine pronoun. Thank you for the thought provoking ideas in your poem.
      Thia

      • Hello Thia

        So glad you stopped by and read my poem. Thank you for all the kind words dear.

        The masculine reference comes from the Arabic language. Much like French, everything gets to have a gender. In Arabic, the river, the ocean, the sea, the moon, and the swamp are all male. While the lake, the oasis, the earth, and the sun, are all female.

        There’s an old poem that was turned into an epic song about the Nile river. It’s an amazing piece of music, performance, and literary genius. I often play it deep into the night for inspiration and sheer pleasure. And it also addresses the river as a ‘He’. I guess the effects of all that must have seeped into my poem. 🙂

        I’m thinking now what it would be like to write the poem as a ‘She’ river? Thia, your comment is also thought-provoking. Thanks for that! 🙂

    • Beautiful poem Riham. Your words flow easily and the images are powerful. The river is a great example of finding a way no matter what might try to impede the journey. A wonderful lesson.

      This is my favourite verse:
      He doesn’t splash endlessly into the sand
      In an embrace too shy of a love affair
      A separation following an innocent kiss
      Warmth and abandonment repeat
      In a cursed cycle of eternal yearning
      And bottomless thirst

      I can see ‘him’ running away from the quick kiss.

      Well done and thanks for sharing.

      • Thank you so much, Debbie. You always read through to the deeper levels of the words. I truly appreciate that.

        I always found that sand and sea relationship quite interesting. they never get enough of each other, but they never stay together. And sometimes the waves leave the sand to dry. It’s easy to find parallels with how we relate to some people. 🙂

        The river seems to have things more in check. even though it’s much more moody and changeable than the sea, it still has some standards when it comes to fleeting affairs.

    • Hi Riham, what a clever poem. The might river being a male force that cannot be tamed. Cannot be tamed till that awful cold-hearted dam!! REally well-done, thanks for sharing.

      • Hello Jane

        Thank you so much, my dear, for your lovely words and thorough read.

        You felt the dashing of the river and the cruelty of the dam exactly as I imagined them. It’s a very real moment in life, that I wish nobody gets to experience. Meandering and sharing renewed hope is a bit of a fantasy sometimes, but I hope it’s what we’ll all get soon.

    • I like the metaphor for a person’s problems in life in your poem. Going back to the gender issue raised by Thia, in Welsh the river (afon) is feminine but the sea (môr) is masculine, making for an interesting relationship between the two. I think in English we would use both as feminine, but am not sure about this.

      Just a suggestion, but would the poem have even more impact if you put it entirely in the present tense. You start in the present tense, but then go on in the past and also the conditional (wouldn’t). I wonder if this would work for example:
      He’s hit by a cold-hearted dam
      A sudden stop that leaves his path a blank
      His clear waters churn and twist
      In the belly of a ruthless restless machine
      He suffocates his tears, runs on
      And searches blindly.

      Ignore me, of course, if you want! Great poem.

    • I like how you took the simple prompt and carried it away with a river. The pain of the river really being stopped in its tracks by the dam was conveyed really well. And i loved the personification in the poem. I will also note i agree with the previous comment that perhaps the whole piece would flow even better in present tense. 🙂
      Thank you so much for writing!

  • Hello Zoltan

    I enjoyed your story a lot. I don’t think I’m a big fan of spiders, but I found myself rooting for Clav and feeling for his mom. Truly glad he missed the broom, found success in the dark end of the room, and was happily reunited with his stubborn mama.

    Fables and children’s stories stir up the oddest feelings in adults.…[Read more]

  • Hello Christian

    Thank you for coming by and leaving this insightful comment. It is one of the hardest things to actually say what we feel. Even the most articulate people hesitate when someone asks ‘how are you?’.

    A sociologist in a Ted talk mentioned that there are about 35,000 different emotions people could feel at any given day. But we…[Read more]

  • Thank you so much DE .. I truly appreciate this 🙂

  • Jenny, what you did with form is absolutely amazing!

    The words flow as if they were completely spontaneous, but the choices are clear and the construction is elaborate. The best impromptu speeches are the ones rehearsed for hours 🙂

    I like several lines, but these stayed with me:
    ‘They plucked each petal from my stem
    and pilfered the…[Read more]

  • This is a very interesting poem, and quite fitting in the chaotic times we are living. The questions are legitimate, and the proposed answers are courageous. It maintains a high spirit despite all the confusion, and this is truly nice.

    I have a few suggestions regarding the structure. I think that even in free verse, a subtle structure and a…[Read more]

  • The photo that goes along with this pretty Haiku created a feast for the senses.

    In three brief lines, you captured the beauty of the universe. And ended it with a line that’s so original in this context. It literally took me by surprise!

    Lovely work Angelique.

  • Gene, your fragment is lighthearted, well rhymed, and absolutely easy on the ear!

    It’s not totally a fragment either, the whole story is in these four lines. And I think it would be lovely as the lyrics of a song. I like the possibilities in this line: ‘Where are you taking me to?’. If your song can answer that, it’s going to be a hit 🙂

  • It’s amazing how many thoughts could cross a person’s brain in mere moments. An avalanche of memories could start with a line in a song. The reactions of others could be very different from ours. They could easily be indifferent to what moves us deeply.

    I like the juxtaposing of the vague backstory alongside the specific places and even…[Read more]

  • Thank you, Debbie!

    I am so glad You feel this way about the poem 🙂 .. I think the lessons were more of introspection, like the internal debate we have occasionally. This is especially true when a person loses something he took for granted.

  • Lovely poem Debbie .. I like that it applies easily to anything that’s lost and deeply missed.

    The opening lines are incredible, I like the way you jump right into the main issue. And the bat metaphor is so clever, it sums up the state of panic when the senses are confused and the compass lost.

    This line seems hard to write – or admit – but…[Read more]

  • A Haiku is simple and hard. That’s the secret of its power and beauty.

    The imagery is concentrated and needs no further explanation. I think the biting chill of winter – and what came with it – can easily be felt even in the sweltering heat of summer.

    These are words that stay and linger in the mind long after they are read!

  • I love the last four lines!

    The sum-up of the duality is incredibly powerful! This is like the closing of a well-presented case. The choice between the porcelain doll and the wanton wind is explained to the minutest detail. The motives, the consequences, the slightest ruminations of the soul, it’s all in there.

    Thanks for a lovely and…[Read more]

  • This is candid, lovely, and easy on the ear.

    I like the soft flow of the uncomplicated words. And the new-found courage to mute the external noises and listen to the internal ones! The realization of having dreams and emotions seems to come as a surprise, I find that worthy of contemplation. We live with ourselves for so long, but we rarely…[Read more]

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Riham Gharib

Profile picture of Riham Gharib

@riham

active 1 week, 3 days ago